K&J – IRONMAN Weekend Approaches

Every year, IRONMAN volunteer captains gather at the annual Captain’s Dinner. In 2013, they gathered in the Armstrong Room at High Peaks Resort in Lake Placid. We caught up with many of them and asked about their units.. and we hear some great stories about past IRONMAN events. We’ll also speak with Race Director Greg Borzileri and Kathy Pfohl who is in charge of managing the volunteer effort for IRONMAN.

K&J – RE-AIR – 072613 – IRONMAN Volunteer Captains

As IRONMAN 2014 shifts into high gear we found one athlete whose just turned pro..

Swim, bike, run, eat, and recover like this up-and-coming IRONMAN 70.3 specialist.

(From the IRONMAN official Website – Written by Zoie Clift) 

Dallas-based pro Lauren “Lou” Barnett has found a sweet spot in the IRONMAN 70.3 distance. She made her pro debut at the distance in New Orleans this year, nabbing first place in 4:21:34. Since then, she has been on the podium in every 70.3 race she has competed this season (IRONMAN70.3 Kansas and Buffalo Springs Lake).

“I love the blend of endurance and speed, and enjoy the training designed to mesh those two elements,” says Barnett on the distance. “Working full time, I find the training manageable. And I appreciate being able to race more frequently than racing at the IRONMAN distance would allow.” To get her in prime shape, Barnett’s coach, Matt Smith of Mile High Multisport, has her training between 18 and 20 hours a week.

Barnett says so far in the season she’s focused on learning experiences. She says the later part of her season will focus on gaining points for the 2015 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championships in Austria. For the near future, Barnett says she plans to compete in Olympic distance and IRONMAN 70.3 racing. “I’m sure I will take a stab at the IRONMAN distance at some point.” she said. Look for Barnett and her Brandon at this Sunday’s IRONMAN 70.3 Racine.

Below, Barnett shares some tips from her IRONMAN 70.3 training log.

→ Injury: Barnett planned to make her pro debut at IRONMAN 70.3 Panama in February, but injured herself in a bike wreck a day before the race. “I realized just because I couldn’t train didn’t mean I couldn’t improve as an athlete,” she said about her post-injury downtime. Her recovery routine included reading mental toughness books, studying course notes, and mapping out her nutrition. “After two months, I raced in New Orleans and that was my third run in eight weeks. The body is amazing, much stronger than the credit we give it.”

→ Favorite swim: “I love doing ladders, a format the increases endurance and breaks up monotony. Ladder training consists of distances that increase or decrease in length over the course of a given set. Since the set constantly changes, it keeps it fun. The goal is to increase your average speed with each shorter distance. For instance, 50-75-100-125-150-175-200- and then go back down, with less rest as the distance decreases.”

→ Favorite bike: “I love our long group rides on the weekends because I get the social component. The group I ride with pushes each other. We’ll focus on endurance but also power, strength, and speed by adding in a pre-determined interval set or a 90 minute time trial. I often feel my best running off a long, hard bike like that, so I tend to enjoy a post-ride brick that might look like one mile hard (IRONMAN 70.3 pace), one mile easy, for an hour.”

→ Favorite run: “Matt has been adding in some swing pace runs, which I prefer to do on the treadmill to make sure I’m hitting the pacing. I usually run outdoors, so I’ve been finding enjoyment in tuning in to some good jams, dialing in really specific paces on the treadmill, and just cruising. For these runs, there is about a minute fluctuation between paces, with some time spent slightly faster and slightly slower than your goal race pace. It’s teaching your fast twitch muscles to fire when needed, and you get in a nice endurance run by doing multiple sets of the swing pacing. For instance, four minutes at 6:30, four minutes at 6:20, two minutes at 7:10, eight minutes at 6:00 might be one set. Surprisingly, it flies by!”

→ Post race: “Recovery starts with food right away. Refueling is key. If there are ice baths and massages available at a race, I’m hitting them up. I’d rather be out cheering and socializing, but I know how much my future self will love me if I’m diligent about recovering immediately. I’ve been racing with much less turnaround than in seasons past, so recovery is very important.”

 Once home post race: “I head straight to Performance Chiropractic and Sports Medicine, one of the companies I partner with, and I get an adjustment, do American Cryotherapy, and use their Normatec boots. The rest of the week is catching up on sleep and plenty of yoga.”

→ Eat like Lauren: “My husband got me into beet juice! I love Biotta. It helps strengthen the immune system and endurance. And it’s yummy. I compliment that with Nuun and Zico coconut water for hydration and electrolyte replenishment throughout the day, and I love Svelte,which is a ready-to-go organic protein shake. I also eat way too much Maranatha almond butter. Rice cakes with almond butter, honey, and a banana on top is my go-to. And the brand Love Grown based in Boulder has my heart. Their granolas and oatmeal are incredible.”

→ Best advice: “Stay strong and have fun, and remember that beyond that you are the only one dictating expectations. My coach told me this before a race, and it stuck with me.”

→ On going pro: “Many athletes make the jump too soon, and it leaves them with poor self-confidence which really affects performance. I spent the entire season prior to getting my pro card evaluating my racing against the pros, improving my swimming, biking, and running skills, and developing the mindset of a competitor who is comfortable racing off the front or coming from behind.”

 

Originally from: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/news/articles/2014/07/spotlight-lauren-barnett.aspx#ixzz3875ogxeJ

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